Hijacked Cuban Planes Still Caught in Limbo 2

FILE - In this Tuesday Nov. 12, 2002 file photo, old single engine airplane are seen at a Cuban airport in Los Palacios, near Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Cuban pilot Nemencio Carlos Alonso Guerra stole a small plane, similar to these shown, and flew to Florida with seven relatives. At face value, they are three old planes not worth much more their parts and scrap metal. Stolen from the Cuban government during a six-month period ending in April 2003 - two by hijackers, one by its pilot - all three landed at Key West International Airport, a 116-mile flight from struggling Havana to the gleaming shores of the U.S. (AP Photo/Jose Goitia, File)

FILE – In this Tuesday Nov. 12, 2002 file photo, old single engine airplane are seen at a Cuban airport in Los Palacios, near Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Cuban pilot Nemencio Carlos Alonso Guerra stole a small plane, similar to these shown, and flew to Florida with seven relatives. At face value, they are three old planes not worth much more their parts and scrap metal. Stolen from the Cuban government during a six-month period ending in April 2003 – two by hijackers, one by its pilot – all three landed at Key West International Airport, a 116-mile flight from struggling Havana to the gleaming shores of the U.S. (AP Photo/Jose Goitia, File)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Christine Armario  (AP) KEY WEST, Fla. — At face value, they are three old planes not worth much more than their parts and scrap metal. Stolen from the Cuban government during a six-month period ending in April 2003 — two by hijackers, one by its pilot — all three landed at Key West International Airport, a 116-mile flight from struggling Havana to the gleaming shores of the U.S.

Fidel Castro repeatedly demanded the planes be returned. Instead, they were seized by U.S. courts to satisfy part of a $27 million judgment won by a Cuban-American woman who had unwittingly married a Cuban spy in Miami.

The story of what happened to the planes in the ensuing years reads like another chapter in the history of stymied, contentious U.S.-Cuba relations, with the new owners unable to get the planes anywhere.

The first of the three planes to land in Key West was a yellow, Soviet-built crop-duster that pilot Nemencio Carlos Alonso Guerra used to fly seven passengers, many of them relatives, to the U.S. in November 2002.

Cuba wanted the biplane back, but a Florida judge agreed with Ana Margarita Martinez that it should be seized and sold to partially pay the judgment she was awarded under an anti-terrorism law. In 1996, her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, had fled back to Cuba after infiltrating the Miami-based anti-Castro group Brothers to the Rescue. The next day, Cuban fighter jets shot down two of the group’s Cessnas over international waters, killing four pilots.

The aging Antonov AN-2 Colt was auctioned at the Key West airport in 2003 and Martinez placed the highest bid, $7,000.

“We had a victory — we got to keep this property of the Cuban government,” Martinez said after the auction.

She hoped to sell it for a profit later but instead gave it to Cuban-American artist Xavier Cortada, who painted half of it with a colorful mural as part of an exhibit commemorating Cuba’s independence.

After the exhibit, Cortada eventually donated the plane to Florida International University, which planned to display it but couldn’t find a building to house it. Today, it deteriorates under tarps on a far corner of FIU’s campus.

Article continues here:  Hijacked Cuban planes still caught in limbo

2 comments

  1. This is very good,any victory even if is small is a victory.Our authorities should continue confiscating Castro’s assets,the same way he did to American companies after taking power in Cuba.

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