New JFK Assassination Theory: Cuban Double Agent Led Plot 7

Rene Dussaq

                     Rene Dussaq

By Joshua Rhett Miller, New York Post

More than 50 years after President John F. Kennedy was gunned down in Dallas, new evidence uncovered in the secret diaries of a Cold War spy and assassin implicates another clandestine figure believed to be working as a double agent for Cuba, an explosive new book claims.

The never-before-revealed diaries of Douglas DeWitt Bazata, a decorated officer for the United States Office of Strategic Services — the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency — claim that his longtime close friend and fellow spy, René Alexander Dussaq, was a “primary organizer and plotter” of Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963.

The diaries reveal that Dussaq might even have fired the fatal “shot or shots” that killed the 35th president of the United States, according to author Robert K. Wilcox’s latest book, “Target: JFK, The Spy Who Killed Kennedy?,” which goes on sale Nov. 14.

“Douglas Bazata was deeply embedded in the world of secrets, especially those surrounding JFK’s death,” Wilcox writes. “He was there at the birth of the CIA as an early and major player in that murkiest of worlds … He was an insider.”

In his diaries, Bazata wrote that the two men first met in Havana, Cuba, during the early 1930s, when Bazata, a US Marine, was given his first mission as a hitman: to assassinate a Cuban revolutionary. The mission failed, but the pair’s bond was sealed forever after Dussaq saved Bazata’s life.

The bond deepened in 1944, when both men were part of WWII’s Operation Jedburgh, in which more than 250 American and Allied paratroopers jumped behind enemy lines across France, the Netherlands and Belgium to fight against German occupation. Dussaq’s larger-than-life legend began here: He was nicknamed “Captain Bazooka” for demonstrating the Army’s new anti-tank rocket launchers to the Maquis, French resistance guerrillas. He’s also credited with bluffing a German general into believing he was surrounded by American troops, leading to the capture of up to 500 Nazis.

Dussaq — who was born in Buenos Aires and educated in Geneva and Cuba — became a naturalized US citizen in 1942. The son of a Cuban diplomat, he had tried to enlist after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor but was deemed a potential security risk. However, the US Army was desperate for infantrymen at the time and ultimately accepted him. Dussaq quickly rose through the ranks, becoming a lieutenant instructor for the elite 101st Airborne Division, the “Screaming Eagles.”

One top-ranked OSS official told his counterparts in London that Dussaq, who spoke six languages, was an exceptional athlete and a master of “unusual and hazardous work of a physical nature,” references to earlier work as a deep-sea diver, treasure hunter and Hollywood movie stuntman.

Article continues here:  Cuban Double Agent Led JFK Plot

 

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7 comments

  1. How interesting, this account by Mr. Rhett.

    According to his account he states; “in his diaries, Bazata wrote that the two men first met in Havana, Cuba, during the early 1930s, when Bazata, a U.S. Marine, was given his first mission as a hitman: to assassinate a Cuban revolutionary. The mission failed, but the pair’s bond was sealed forever after Rene A. Dussaq saved Bazata’s life.”

    So, who was this so called “Cuban revolutionary” that Bazata was given in “his first mission, as hitman, to assasinate”?

    Bottom line, it would be greatly appreciated if Mr. Rhett can disclose–if he already hasn´t and or anybody having this information about the identity of the so called “Cuban revolutionary” who´s name and identity was given to the U.S. Marine´s “first mission., as a hitman, to assasinate” the so called “Cuban revolutionary”?

    John Martino who was born, in Atlantic City, in 1910, at that time was in his late 20s. Also, the CIA was not founded until 17 years later, which is a long time after the decade of the 1930´s when Bazata the U.S. Marine and Rene A. Dussaq first met.

  2. As disclosed in the book, the person Bazata was sent in by the marines to assassinate, according to his diary, was Batista, who Castro later overthrew, but at that time was in opposition to the current Cuban government. It’s heavily detailed in the book. Regarding, the CIA. I’m not sure what the problem here is, but yes, the CIA, after WWII, succeeded OSS and nothing in my book contradicts that. Robert K. Wilcox, author, Target:JFK: The spy who killed Kennedy?

  3. Fulgencio Batista was—hardly—barely on the scene, at the time of the alleged chronology in this book, during the early 1930´s and by the mid late 1930´s Fulgencio Batista could already, hardly, be viewed as a revolutionary. The biggest problem at that time was the communist left setting a power base in Cuba, inadvertently backed by Ambassador to the United States in Cuba; Jefferson Caffery of the same school as former ambassador to Cuba Benjamin Sumner Welles .

    Following is a synopsis of that chronology just before Fulgencio Batista later became President. Historically. Notwithstanding, the new government in Cuba includes Ramón Grau, as President of Cuba and Antonio Guiteras as Vice President. Guiteras is credited with keeping this government together for the time it lasts. U.S. Ambassador Sumner Welles refers to these changes as “communistic” and “irresponsible,” and the U.S. government never recognizes the Grau-Guiteras government.

    An article in the New York Times quotes students from the Directorio, who assert that their movement compares “most closely with the new revolutionary Republic of Spain.”

    Guiteras was the revolutionary not Fulgencio Batista.

    1933 CHRONOLOGY

    September 10.

    From the balcony of the Presidential Palace, Ramón Grau San Martín takes the oath of office in front of large crowds. This government lasts 100 days, but engineers radical changes in Cuban society. It nullifies the Platt Amendment (except for the Guantánamo naval base lease) sets up an 8-hour working day, establishes a Department of Labor, opens the university to the poor, grants peasants the right to the land they were farming, gives women the right to vote, and reduces electricity rates by 40 percent. The new government includes Antonio Guiteras as Vice President. He is credited with keeping this government together for the time it lasts. U.S. Ambassador Sumner Welles refers to these changes as “communistic” and “irresponsible,” and the U.S. government never recognizes the Grau-Guiteras government.

    September 15.

    An article in the New York Times quotes students from the Directorio, who assert that their movement compares “most closely with the new revolutionary Republic of Spain.”

    September 16.

    In the front page of El País, Guiteras states: “In our capitalist system, no government has been so ready to defend the interests of workers and peasants as the present revolutionary government. Nevertheless, induced by American companies, the workers are unconsciously helping in trying to topple the government… It is essential that the worker become aware of the reality we are facing today. It is impossible for the masses to gain political control; thus, instead of opposing the revolutionary government they should cooperate with it to obtain the satisfaction of the most immediate demands of the workers, and to avoid being an instrument of imperialist companies. The National Confederation of Workers will be responsible before History for the setback that the masses will suffer if we give the Americans a pretext to intervene.”

    September 20.

    Decree No. 1693 establishes an eight-hour day for workers, and Decree No. 1703 requires that all professionals (lawyers, physicians, architects, etc.) become members of their respective professional organizations in order to continue practicing.

    September 22.

    The Student Left Wing, (Ala Izquierda Estudiantil) formed by students who have moved away from the University Student Directorate, begins to protest the removal of certain professors from Havana schools.

    September 29.

    The police uses weapons to disperse a demonstration organized by the Communist party to honor Julio Antonio Mella, whose ashes were just brought back from Mexico. 6 people are killed, and many others wounded.

    October 2.

    The Department of Labor is created.

    October 2.

    The Army attacks the National Hotel. 14 officers are killed in the battle, 17 wounded and the rest taken prisoner.

    October 19.

    Grau invites Dr. Fernando Ortiz to join the cabinet and to propose a solution that could unify all revolutionary groups. Dr. Ortiz declines to join the cabinet but accepts the offer to propose a solution. Dr. Ortiz’s proposal, to include representatives of all important political groups in a genuine “national” government fails due to mutual mistrust, suspicion and past resentment.

    October 24.

    The ABC Radical withdraws its support for the revolutionary government.
    “At the end of the October,” writes Luis E. Aguilar in Cuba 1933: Prologue to Revolution, “hope for conciliation had died, terrorism in Havana increased, and the two most important sectors of the anti-Machado forces-the students and the ABC-were openly attacking each other.”

    November 3.

    A meeting at Sergio Carbo’s house in Havana includes Grau, Guiteras, students and various other members of government, military command and the Revolutionary Junta. They have a recently passed decree that allows them to arrest (and, if necessary, kill) Fulgencio Batista. When he finally arrives with only one bodyguard, Batista notices that he is in danger and is able to talk his way out of the situation. Grau is later blamed for accepting Batista’s apology.

    November 5.

    After a difficult and emotional meeting the University Student Directorate dissolves.

    November 8.

    Part of the Cuban Air Force and one unit of the Army rebel against the government. Nationalists lead by Rafael Iturralde and Colonel Blas Hernandez (the anti-Machado guerilla fighter) are joined by the ABC, lead by Carlos Saladrigas.
    By noon, the rebels capture several police stations in Havana, and two planes attack the presidential palace. Rumors of the insurrection are spreading throughout the city. Batista later orders the Army to fight on the side of the government.

    November 9.

    At 6 p.m., Grau announces victory for the government, and he condemns the actions of “false revolutionaries.”

    November 16.

    Horace G. Knowles, former U.S. Ambassador to Bolivia and Nicaragua, accuses Sumner Welles of “openly helping the counterrevolution.” He suggests that the U.S. should recognize the revolutionary government. [Only Uruguay and Mexico have recognized the government so far.]

    November 24.

    Sumner Welles is replaced by Jefferson Caffery. [In Cuba, this is seen as proof that the U.S. intends to recognize the revolutionary government.]

    December 1

    A new law called “El Derecho de Tanteo” (The right of estimate) is passed, giving the government the right to be considered a potential buyer in any sugar transaction. This law is meant to eliminate the way American and Cuban companies avoid paying taxes by selling their sugar mills or land at very low prices to another company, often a subsidiary.
    The Committee for the Defense of the Zafra (sugar crop) is formed by wealthy hacendados who announce their support for the revolutionary government.

    December 8.

    Guiteras announces that any one caught stealing or damaging government property is to be shot on the spot.

    December 18.

    U.S. Ambassador Jefferson Caffery arrives in Havana. From Cuba 1933: Prologue to Revolution, by Luis E. Aguilar:
    “Caffery belonged to the same school of suave diplomats as Sumner Welles. Without any previous personal involvement in the Cuban imbroglio, he had a chance to be impartial and to judge the situation from an objective standpoint. He had, nevertheless, similar and possibly even stronger convictions than Welles about whom the American government should or should not support. A political conservative of elegant manners, Caffery was once described as a “somewhat frostbitten diplomat of the old school, who holds to the Hamilton belief that those who have should rule.” “Diplomacy, as I interpret it,” he declared in Havana, “nowadays consists largely in cooperation with American business.”

    December 19.

    In the front page of Diario de la Marina, Caffery states that “my country’s policy toward Cuba will remain the same.”

    December 22.

    A huge pro-government demonstration gathers in front of the Presidential Palace to thank the government for its nationalistic stance.

    In fact, what is contradictory in this whole analysis of this book is that on January 14. Guiteras announces the nationalization of American-owned Electric Bond and Share Company. It is his last governmental act. Thereafter on January 15. Now a Colonel, Fulgencio Batista, encouraged by Caffery, forces the resignation of the Grau-Guiteras government.

    BOTTOM LINE:

    Batista purged, CUBA, at that time of a nationalistic tendency underpinned by revolutionary communistic tendencies positioned against the influence of the United States in Cuba. Guiteras was the REVOLUTIONARY of the day and not Batista. Batista was at the right place at the right time to intervene and later develop his career

    CONCLUSION

    There is NO WAY Bazata was contracted by the CIA to assassinate Fulgencio Batista. If anybody would have been targeted for assassination, by the CIA, it would have been Antonio Guiteras a proponent of revolutionary socialism.

    Johnny Martino has been widely documented to have conspired in the JFK assassination. Martino did not know this guy, Rene Dussaq, at all, who claims he killed JFK. This does not seem plausible. at all, regarding JFK assassination, or it is futile attempt at disinformation.

  4. Why don’t you read the book. It does not say Bazata was contracted by the CIA to assassinate Batista. He was a young marine. It was the marines on a ship anchored off Cuba that sent him in. Batista was his target. That’s what the secret diaries say. Bazata later got a medal for his action. The citation is in the book, as is the credibility, pro and con. READ THE BOOK.

    • Indeed, I will peruse this book.

      Notwithstanding, I kindly refer you to the text of the original article here as posted on Cuba Confidential, which states: “Bazata, a US Marine, was given his first mission as a hit man: to assassinate a Cuban revolutionary”.

      Thereafter, because the Cuba Confidential article did not specify who, the author of the book claimed, was such “Cuban revolutionary” the marine Bazata was to “assassinate”, I posted here my question regarding such a claim, by asking: who was the “Cuban revolutionary” to be assassinated? You, thereafter, kindly replied back, and I quote your reply: “As disclosed in the book, the person Bazata was sent in by the marines to assassinate, according to his diary, was Batista.

      Immediately—and without having to read the book accept or reject such a claim—I knew such a claim was a falsehood as I further documented in the chronology I posted here in my reply to you. Why? First of all, Fulgencio Batista was not a “Cuban revolutionary”, and least a participant in any way shape or form, as an individual revolutionary, or even as a rogue military individual–à la Hugo Chavez, a Socialist proponent—more particularly, within the chronology alleged in the book. Batista was a career military man and was firmly aligned with U.S. interests. On December 11, 1958, U.S. Ambassador Earl Smith visited Batista at his hacienda named Kuquine. Ambassador Smith informed Batista the U.S. could no longer support his government. Batista requested to go to his house in Daytona Beach, Florida. The ambassador denied Batista´s request and suggested he seek asylum in Spain instead. That type of actuation hardly meets the threshold criteria of being a Cuban revolutionary. Batista was an obedient puppet who acknowledged when the U.S. told him to “get the hell outta of Dodge”.

      As I further supplemented in my prior post, as a reply to you, based on my historical knowledge of Cuba, a more authentic Cuban Revolutionary during that chronology would have been Antonio Guiteras a Socialist activist in Cuba, or even Ruben Martinez Villena, a lawyer who published poetry and short stories in the newspapers of the day and also in magazines from 1917 through the late 1920s. In 1923, Villena was one of a total of thirteen writers and artists who participated in a protest called “La Protesta de los Trece”. Their intention was to denounce the administration of President Alfredo Zayas. They subsequently founded the “Grupo Minorista”, which was a group of artists and intellectuals who later turned very influential in Cuban sociological culture and social-politics. Villena then met Julio Antonio Mella, the founder of the Communist Party of Cuba, and got more involved in a social struggle that perceived Cuba as a neo-colonial government subdued to the United States interests. In 1925 Villena became Mella’s attorney in the trial for “insulting” President Zayas. Villena became ill with tuberculosis and traveled to the U.S. and the Soviet Union. He returned to Cuba in 1932 seriously ill when during 1932 and 1933 he organized the general strike, in Cuba, which ended Gerardo Machado’s government. Villena died in Havana in 1934 at the La Esperanza Sanatory.

      By the way, speaking of “Cuban revolutionary”, a postage stamp was issued December 20, 1999 by the Postal Authority in Cuba commemorating Villena as a “Cuban revolutionary”. (see at Scott 2010 Stamp Catalog p. 661)

      The above is all true, which correctly and accurately documents who were key principal actors in Cuban revolutionary activity during the 20´s, as aligned to the socialist communist ideological tendencies opposite to Fulgencio Batista who was never a communist.

      Regarding the part of Bazata´s involvement–as even the so called trigger man of JFK (I highly doubt and decline such a claim) John Martino was put in prison by the Cuban government for three years—for among many things—plotting, successfully, to secretly funnel out of Cuba the wife of Esteban Ventura Novo, a former Batista police chief executioner who had fled Cuba with Batista on his plane on January 1, 1959. I personally interviewed Esteban Ventura Novo, in 1994, regarding some aspects of his life and other matters related to Cuba. Bazata was never a name mentioned by John Martino as part of the individuals involved in John Martino´s testimony regarding the JFK assassination. Martino´s wife Florence Williard (schuylkill haven Pennsylvania) her maiden name, testified her husband Johnny told her: “Flo they´re going to kill him when he gets to Dallas”. The latter is information in the public domain and it ties in together with the testimony of Edward Martino, whom I have interviewed, son of John Martino and who was 15 years old when they apprehended his father and him in Havana, Cuba and put him in prison and his son in custody. Edward Martino claims his father told him, when they were at their house, the day President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas: “Edward, go stay by the radio and let me know immediately when they announce anything about the President John F. Kennedy”. The name Bazata was never mentioned by anyone throughout any of the scenarios known regarding the event of the JFK assassination.

      All very interesting, no smoking gun.

  5. You are confused. I didn’t write the article. I wrote the book. Bazata is not the person named in the book as the assassin of JFK. It’s his secret diaries that name another as JFK’s assassin. Read the book. Understand what it says. Then we’ll discuss it.

  6. 1.) Mr. Wilcox, let´s get this very straight: I never textually used the word “article” in any of my two replies to you, or at any time, to make reference to the Cuba Confidential posted account—as textually posted—by its writer, Joshua Rhett Miller. To proof my statement beyond an allegation, but a FACT, read the first post I wrote on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:01 pm. In the first line I stated: “How interesting, this account by Mr. Rhett.” So I did NOT refer to the Cuba Confidential post written by Joshua Rhett Miller as an article, as you erroneously claim in your last post. However, Instead, it is YOU who refers to the account published in Cuba Confidential written by Joshua Rhett Miller, as an “article”, a textual word you brought into our discussion.

    2.) The Cuba Confidential account posted by Joshua Rhett Miller states who wrote the book ( you “Wilcox”). Further, I posted: It would be greatly appreciated, if Mr. Rhett can disclose–if he already hasn´t and or anybody having this information about the identity of the so called “Cuban revolutionary” who´s name and identity was given to the U.S. Marine´s “first mission., as a hit man, to assassinate” the so called “Cuban revolutionary”? That is when you appeared on the scene with a post. This is what you replied to me in your post: “Why don’t you read the book. It does not say Bazata was contracted by the CIA to assassinate Batista. He was a young marine. It was the marines on a ship anchored off Cuba that sent him in. Batista was his target.” However, Mr. Rhett wrote in his account as posted on Cuba Confidential: “He was there at the birth of the CIA as an early and major player in that murkiest of worlds … He was an insider.” Immediately thereafter, Mr. Rhett writes in his posted account: “In his diaries, Bazata wrote that the two men first met in Havana, Cuba, during the early 1930s, when Bazata, a US Marine, was given his first mission as a hit man: to assassinate a Cuban revolutionary. He is directly implying that since Bazata was an “insider” in that “murkiest of worlds” and was there at the “birth of the CIA”, such was a CIA mission. Particularly, knowing—as you must know—“Marines” whether on a ship off the Cuban coast, or on a barrack, do NOT initiate an intelligence mission without intelligence directives first given by the higher ups in U.S. intelligence.

    Notwithstanding, having cleared your erroneous allegation as to your erroneous statement that I am “confused”, the main issue is that Batista was NOT a “Cuban Revolutionary” and therefore could not have been the target of an assassination to be executed by Bazata the marine. That is the issue and that is the error of chronology and that was the objective pf my post; to prove Bazata–whether in the CIA, a marine, whatever—on a mission to assassinate a so called Cuban revolutionary COULD NEVER HAVE BEEN FULGENCI0 BATISTA ZALDIVAR.

    Now, whomever wrote this–whether in the Cuba Confidential account or in the book in question, is not confused, but gravely mistaken. There is no need to shift such ground of the responsibility of proof upon I, for I know my Cuban history extremely well. It is I who now asks re-read my posts. You will see: a.) Batista was NOT indeed a Cuban revolutionary. b.) Knowing Batista was not a Cuban revolutionary, Batista was NOT the target of an assassination, whether plotted by the CIA or whomever. Lastly, you make NO mention, whatsoever, on the other salient fact in your book, according to the Rhett account posted on Cuba Confidential: The “JFK assassination”. I believe Bazata was NOT a key player and for that, I provided you with direct, first hand, testimony from a key player—as known through public domain—about the JFK assassination. Bazata was never a target of the Warren Commission as John Martino was. According to testimony provided by Martino´s wife, he died of a heart attack during a visit to his home by U.S. Army Colonel Bayo, prior to John Martino testifying before the Warren Commission. According to Florence Martino (Williard her maiden name), John Martino asked her to go for pork chops to the supermarket, when she got back, John had died of a heart attack. It will be very interesting to read those “diaries”, they have to be in synchronization with the times and the players of the JFK assassination event. Otherwise, perhaps another “siren call”.

    My salutations to you.

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