A Cuban Spy in Politics, Culture And Art in Mexico 1

Teresa Proenza. Image: DCubanos

At 7:00 p.m tonight, the book “Do not Forget“: Teresa Proenza (1908-1989). A Cuban spy in politics, culture, and art in Mexico, by historian Xavier Guzmán Urbiola will be presented in the Sala Adamo Boari of the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City.

“I wrote it from affection, I’m not interested in prosecuting anyone, I do it as a historian,” said Guzmán Urbiola, who met Proenza and struck up a friendship with her for several years.

Among anecdotes, stories, events, and information revealed so far, Xavier Guzmán Urbiola delves into the enigmatic life of Teresa Proenza.

Nobody had gathered this information, the book is made with first-hand sources, such as the Proenza file, which is housed in the National Center for Research, Documentation, and Information of Plastic Arts (Cenidiap) of the National Institute of Fine Arts and Literature (INBAL), as well as its file in the Federal Security Directorate (DFS).

80 percent of what is mentioned is unknown, many people who had access to the manuscripts, and now the book, is amazed at the number of episodes and events it contains. It is full of surprises, said Guzmán Urbiola.

Teresa Proenza

Teresa Proenza was born in Cuba in 1908 and died in 1989 in Mexico; her career covers almost the 20th century. “I tried to make the story of a typical Communist militant, with all its commitments, dreams, disenchantments, self-criticism and changes in approaches.”
She has to live very unique situations of the twentieth century and treats outstanding people. she leaves Cuba because of a bombing of her house, for the communist militancy of her brothers.

The year was 1932, the sons fled to Colombia, and the parents sent their sister Caridad to Guatemala, while Teresa and Juana Luisa went to Honduras.

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

In 1933, Teresa arrives in exile in Mexico. It is the end of the maximato and principle of cardenismo. She is involved in various movements, is an activist and correspondent in the Spanish Civil War. During the Battle of Teruel sends collaborations to Cuban newspapers.

Later, in 1945, she met Narciso Bassols, Enrique González Martíne, and Diego Rivera, with whom she began to establish closer and closer relations of friendship; although they differ in politics, they admire the artist very much.

Xavier Guzmán comments that Teresa Proenza told him that knowing Diego was the “balm that helped her overcome her sectarianism”.

Feature continues here: Cuban Spy in Mexico

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Diplomats Sue Canada Government Over Mystery Illness in Cuba 1

The diplomats say Ottawa misled staff in Havana about the seriousness of the mysterious illness (Reuters)

By the BBC

A group of Canadian diplomats is suing the country’s government for C$28m ($21.1m; £16.4m) after they succumbed to a mysterious illness in Cuba.

The group of 14, including diplomats’ family members, says Ottawa took too long to warn, evacuate and treat them.

Last year, Canadian and US officials were recalled from Havana after complaining of dizziness and migraines.

The cause of the illness is unknown, but Canada has discounted the idea of a “sonic attack” on its embassy.

In a statement, the diplomats said: “Throughout the crisis, Canada downplayed the seriousness of the situation, hoarded and concealed critical health and safety information, and gave false, misleading and incomplete information to diplomatic staff.”

“My wife, she isn’t the same anymore,” one unnamed diplomat told Canadian broadcaster CBC.

“She has gaps in her memory, headaches, problems hearing. She picks up the telephone to make a call but forgets why, enters rooms without reason.”

According to CBC, staff at the Canadian embassy began experiencing symptoms of the so-called “Havana syndrome” in spring 2017.

Several families were subsequently moved from Havana, but until April 2018 Canada continued to post new staff to Cuba despite warnings from US counterparts who had received similar complaints.

The US withdrew most of its non-essential personnel from the country in September 2017 and said 21 embassy employees had been affected.

Last month, Canada said it would be cutting its embassy staff by up to half.

At a news conference in Washington, Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said she was aware of the lawsuit.

“I am not going to comment on the specifics, but I do want to reiterate that I have met with some of these diplomats and, as I said to them, their health and safety needs to be our priority.”

Cuba has repeatedly denied any involvement in the incident.

The country’s Foreign Minister, Bruno Rodriguez, said US claims were a “political manipulation” aimed at damaging bilateral relations.

 

 

 

 

The Irish Times Highlights Key Role of Cuban Spies in Keeping Venezuelan Regime in Power Reply

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaidó waves to supporters at a rally against President Nicolás Maduro’s government in Caracas. Photograph: Carlos Barria

Maduro Holds on to Power Despite Domestic and Global Pressure

Rallies support incumbent and rival Guaidó, as Venezuela’s army backing may be on wane

Tom Hennigan, The Irish Times

Rival presidents led rival mass rallies in Venezuela this weekend as the country’s political stand-off intensified with embattled President Nicolás Maduro backing a plan to move against the last bastion of the opposition after its leader, Juan Guaidó, declared himself interim president on January 23rd.

Speaking at a rally to commemorate 20 years in power for his populist Chavismo movement, Maduro once again ruled out stepping aside and holding new presidential elections as demanded by most countries in the Americas and the European Union.

But he backed a proposal by his own United Socialist Party of Venezuela to bring forward to this year elections for the national assembly, the country’s only institution controlled by the opposition.

“They want to bring forward elections? Let’s have elections!” said a defiant Maduro, whose government has been widely denounced for blatant poll-rigging in recent years.

Meanwhile at a rival rally in Caracas, Guaidó renewed his calls for the military to abandon the regime on the same day that an air force general became the most senior serving officer to recognise him as president. In a video posted on Saturday on social media, Francisco Yánez said a democratic transition was imminent. “People of Venezuela, 90 per cent of the armed forces are not with the dictator,” he added.

Cuban intelligence

Venezuela’s high command has declared its loyalty to Maduro but there are increasing signs of splits within the military, with the regime believed to be ever more reliant on a spy network run by Cuban intelligence officers to identify and neuter attempted insurrections against the regime by lower-ranking officers.

Guaidó called on supporters to keep up the pressure on Maduro to quit what he classified as his “usurpation” of the presidency by holding more rallies this month. He also announced humanitarian aid from the United States would soon be arriving via Colombia, Brazil and an unnamed Caribbean island and called on soldiers manning the frontier to let it enter the country. Maduro denounced the aid operation as a pretext for a military intervention by the US.

Article continues here:  Cuban Spies Prop Up Venezuela Government