Lista de “cubanoamericanos” en la recepción de la Embajada de EEUU en La Habana 1

Lista

Emilioichikawa

Lista de “cubanoamericanos” presentes en la recepción ofrecida por Mr. Jeffrey DeLaurentis en la residencia, tras la ceremonia en la Embajada de EEUU en La Habana:

1-Joe Arriola; 2-Ric Herrero; 3-Freddy Balsera; 4-Felice Gorordo; 5-Paul Cejas; 6-Patrick Hidalgo; 7-Ariel Perera; 8-Pedro Freyre; 9-Hugo Cancio; 10-Carlos Gutiérrez; 11-Joe García (+familiar); 12-Consuelo Arostegui; 13-Marifeli Perez Estable; 14-Annie Betancourt; 15-Ralph Gazitua; 16-Luly Duke; 17-Carlos Saladrigas; 18-Alberto Ibarguen; 19-Dr. Sergio González Arias (+familiar); 20-Ella Fontanals-Cisneros; 21-Andres Fanjul; 22-Silvia Wilhelm; 23-Ralph Patino

FOTO: Secretary Kerry Addresses Crowd at Ambassador’s Residence: by U.S. Department of State/flickr

Woman Who Married Cuban Spy Suing JPMorgan For $57M For Hiding Country’s Cash 2

HECTOR GABINO/AP Ana Margarita Martinez won a $7.1 million judgment against the Cuban government for 'emotional distress' in 2001, after she found out her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, wasn't the man she thought he was.

HECTOR GABINO/AP
Ana Margarita Martinez won a $7.1 million judgment against the Cuban government for ’emotional distress’ in 2001, after she found out her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, wasn’t the man she thought he was.

By Dareh Gregorian, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

A Miami woman who was married to a Cuban double agent wants JPMorgan Chase to pay through the nose for allegedly hiding Cuban cash.

Ana Margarita Martinez won a $7.1 million judgment against the Cuban government for “emotional distress” in 2001, after she found out her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, wasn’t the man she thought he was.

She’d met Roque in 1992, after the former Cuban Air Force major made headlines for allegedly braving shark infested waters to swim to Gitmo seeking political asylum in the U.S.

They dated for three years before getting hitched.

Unbeknownst to Martinez, Roque was an FBI snitch – and an undercover Cuban agent who’d been sent to gather intel on the Cuban exile community in Miami. She found out both after he snuck out of their home one night in 1996, and then appeared on CNN in Cuba a few days later crowing about his accomplishments.

Adding insult to injury, when asked what he missed about Miami, he said just one thing: “My Jeep.”

Martinez, who’d been born in Cuba, said she’d been completely duped. “She believed that Roque shared her anti-communist ideals,” court papers say.

A federal judge in Florida found Cuba liable for Roque’s actions, saying he was “especially offended that Cuba – a country that disregards human rights – has callously trampled the rights of one of our own citizens on our own soil in furtherance of a vile criminal conspiracy.”

Feature continues here: JPMorgan Hides Cuban Assets

JOSE GOITIA/CP Roque was an FBI snitch – and an undercover Cuban agent who'd been sent to gather intel on the Cuban exile community in Miami.

JOSE GOITIA/CP
Juan Pablo Roque was an FBI snitch – and an undercover Cuban agent who’d been sent to gather intelligence on the Cuban exile community in Miami.

 

Spy Snacks……..Did you know? 1

 Mario Llerena in 1957. (John Orris/The New York Times)


Mario Llerena in 1957. (John Orris/The New York Times)

During the late 1950s, Associated Press stringer and Castro agent Mario Llerena reported extensively on the July 26 Movement (Castro’s name for his rebel force). He also served as a source for UPI, the New York Times and other American media outlets. Llerena was also chairman of the New York City faction of the July 26 Movement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Kerry Celebrates US Embassy Opening With Expelled Cuban Spies 4

John Kerry, Gustavo Machin, Josefina Vidal, Jose Ramon Cabanas By Carlie Kollath Wells, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry greets members of the Cuban delegation inside the newly opened embassy, at the end of a flag raising ceremony, in Havana, Cuba, Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. Kerry is accompanied by Gustavo Machin, Cuba's deputy chief of North American affairs, left, Cuba's Josefina Vidal, director general of the U.S. division at Cuba's Foreign Ministry, second right, and Jose Ramon Cabanas, chief of the Cuba mission in Washington D.C., right. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco, Cubadebate)

John Kerry, Gustavo Machin, Josefina Vidal, Jose Ramon Cabanas

By Carlie Kollath Wells, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry greets members of the Cuban delegation inside the newly opened embassy, at the end of a flag raising ceremony, in Havana, Cuba, Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. Kerry is accompanied by Gustavo Machin, Cuba’s deputy chief of North American affairs, left, Cuba’s Josefina Vidal, director general of the U.S. division at Cuba’s Foreign Ministry, second right, and Jose Ramon Cabanas, chief of the Cuba mission in Washington D.C., right. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco, Cubadebate)

Editor’s Note: Cuban’s intelligence services have long perceived the US as a hapless, bumbling giant. Instances like this – Kerry with career Directorate of Intelligence (DI) officers Gustavo Machin and Josefina Vidal – reinforce Havana’s institutionalized contempt. Machin and Vidal were both thrown out of the US for engaging in espionage against the United States.

Cuba Won’t Move ‘One Millimeter’ to Please Enemies in the U.S. 3

Josefina Vidal, Director General of the U.S. division at Cuba's Foreign Ministry, gestures as she speaks with the media at the State Department in Washington, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. The United States and Cuba claimed progress Friday toward ending a half-century diplomatic freeze, suggesting they could clear some of the biggest obstacles to their new relationship within weeks. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Josefina Vidal, Director General of the U.S. division at Cuba’s Foreign Ministry, gestures as she speaks with the media at the State Department in Washington, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. The United States and Cuba claimed progress Friday toward ending a half-century diplomatic freeze, suggesting they could clear some of the biggest obstacles to their new relationship within weeks. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Washington Times

Cuba’s lead negotiator in talks with Washington said Friday the island’s internal affairs would never be on the negotiating table and Havana would never move “one millimeter” to placate enemies in the United States.

“Decisions on internal matters are not negotiable and will never be put on the negotiating agenda in conversations with the United States,” Josefina Vidal, director of U.S. affairs for the Cuban Foreign Ministry, told Reuters.

Cuba will never do absolutely anything, not move one millimeter, to try to respond,” she added.

Ms. Vidal’s comment comes as the U.S. reinstated diplomatic ties with Cuba after 54 years of silence. The U.S. re-opened it’s embassy in Havana on Friday.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said in Havana that the U.S. Congress was unlikely to ever lift a punishing economic embargo on Cuba unless the Communist government improved its human rights record.

Editor’s Note: Career Directorate of Intelligence (DI) Officer Josefina Vidal left the US in May 2003 as part of a mass expulsion of 16 Cuban spy-diplomats.

Special Report: State Department Watered Down Human Trafficking Report 1

human_traffickingBy Jason Szep and Matt Spetalnick

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – In the weeks leading up to a critical annual U.S. report on human trafficking that publicly shames the world’s worst offenders, human rights experts at the State Department concluded that trafficking conditions hadn’t improved in Malaysia and Cuba. And in China, they found, things had grown worse.

The State Department’s senior political staff saw it differently — and they prevailed.

A Reuters examination, based on interviews with more than a dozen sources in Washington and foreign capitals, shows that the government office set up to independently grade global efforts to fight human trafficking was repeatedly overruled by senior American diplomats and pressured into inflating assessments of 14 strategically important countries in this year’s Trafficking in Persons report.

In all, analysts in the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons – or J/TIP, as it’s known within the U.S. government — disagreed with U.S. diplomatic bureaus on ratings for 17 countries, the sources said.

The analysts, who are specialists in assessing efforts to combat modern slavery – such as the illegal trade in humans for forced labor or prostitution – won only three of those disputes, the worst ratio in the 15-year history of the unit, according to the sources.

As a result, not only Malaysia, Cuba and China, but countries such as India, Uzbekistan and Mexico, wound up with better grades than the State Department’s human-rights experts wanted to give them, the sources said. (Graphic looking at some of the key decisions here.

Of the three disputes J/TIP won, the most prominent was Thailand, which has faced scrutiny over forced labor at sea and the trafficking of Rohingya Muslims through its southern jungles. Diplomats had sought to upgrade it to so-called “Tier 2 Watch List” status. It remains on “Tier 3” – the rating for countries with the worst human-trafficking records.

The number of rejected recommendations suggests a degree of intervention not previously known by diplomats in a report that can lead to sanctions and is the basis for many countries’ anti-trafficking policies. This year, local embassies and other constituencies within the department were able to block some of the toughest grades.

State Department officials say the ratings are not politicized. “As is always the case, final decisions are reached only after rigorous analysis and discussion between the TIP office, relevant regional bureaus and senior State Department leaders,” State Department spokesman John Kirby said in response to queries by Reuters.

Special Report continues here: Human Trafficking

 

Obama Gave Cuba “License To Spy” In U.S. [Belated Posting] 2

Posted by: Javier Manjarres, HSPA Hispolitica, on July 20, 2015

The Cuban-American congressional delegation from Miami, Florida, held a press conference denouncing the opening of the U.S. embassy in Havana, Cuba,  as well as calling the new Cuban embassy in the United States as a ” base” for the Cuban Intelligence Service.

Reps. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Carlos Curbelo, and Mario Diaz-Balart, all Republicans, each took turns of expressing their anger and disappointment over President Obama’s apparent acceptance of the 56-years of human rights violations and acts of terrorism committed by the Castro regime.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R) spoke out against Obama’s normalization of diplomatic relations with communist Cuba, saying that the president has given the regime a “license to spy” on the U.S.

Diaz-Balart stated that Obama’s “failed policy of appeasement, appeasing brutal dictators” has threaten U.S. interests, adding that the “Cuban people have not chosen the Castro brothers” as their legitimate representatives.

The Cuban embassy will represent the Cuban Intelligence Service-Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R)

Corbel didn’t mince his words either, saying that the Obama administration has legitimized Cuba, an “enemy of the United States.”

One of the most reckless foreign policy decisions that we have seen in decades in this decision by the Obama administration to legitimize and embrace a government that has been an enemy of the United States. A government that has abused and repressed its own people every single day of its existence. A government that continues sponsoring terrorism around the world, especially here in our hemisphere.-Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R)

Curbelo also stated that the existing and “robust” Cuban spy network in the U.S. now has a base in which to spy from.

 

Palm Beach Newspaper Warns American Firms of Cuba’s Espionage Threat 2

SpyvsSpySeveral Caveats to be Aware of Before Doing Business in Cuba

PalmBeachPost.com / Filed in: Business

Get ready for another round of “Let’s go do business in Cuba” enthusiasm on Friday. That’s when Secretary of State John Kerry is scheduled to raise the Stars and Stripes for the ceremonial opening of the U.S. Embassy in Havana.

Before you go rushing into a business venture on the island that was the communist outpost in the Cold War, you might want to have a talk with Ross Thompson at Classified Worldwide Consulting, which has an office in West Palm Beach. Thompson, the firm’s managing director, has a few caveats to share.

In particular, Thompson cautions that Cuba’s foreign investment and business laws present six key challenges that Americans need to think through ahead of time. They are:

  1. The Cuban government will own a majority stake in the company. A 49-51 percent split is common, but Havana has required a larger share in some sectors.
  2. Your local workforce will be selected by the Cuban government. This selection may not be based on skill or merit but by seniority or cronyism.
  3. Cuban managers will be appointed to mirror your handpicked managers, especially if your senior leadership includes Cuban exiles. The Cuban managers will ultimately control many decisions, or influence them, when dealing with your majority partner, the Cuban government.
  4. Everything in Cuba is heavily influenced by Cuba’s intelligence service, the DGI. You must be very careful to guard your own corporate proprietary information. [Emphasis added]
  5. Vendors you may work with may be fronts, or “cutouts,” for other foreign intelligence services such as those from China, Russia, Iran or North Korea. The capture and exchange of corporate confidential information is a lucrative business, so guard your files. [Emphasis added]

Feature continues here: Cuban Economic Espionage

 

Reception of Cuban Spy Numbers Station HM01 on Tuesday, August 4th 2

By Bulgarian DX blog

CUBA   Reception of Cuban Spy Numbers station HM01 on Tue, August 4

from 0630 on 11462 secret / hidden tx ?Bejucal? Spanish Tue/Thu/Sat

from 0745 on 13435 secret / hidden tx ?Bejucal? Spanish Tue/Thu/Sat

from 0815 on 11635 secret / hidden tx ?Bejucal? Spanish Tue/Thu/Sat

Editor’s Note:  High Frequency (HF) radio broadcasts — better known as “shortwave” or “ham radio” — have been the workhorse of Cuban Intelligence communications for decades. That said, Havana’s use of HF radio for espionage continues to decline, most likely as its spies transition to internet-based means.

Purdue Professor “Lifts” Images From Academic Website Without Attribution – Insists It’s Not Plagiarism 5

Lopez_F14By Chris Simmons

In his recent work on Jose Marti, Purdue University English Professor, Alfred Lopez, borrowed images from the website “Latin American Studies.” In existence since 1997, this site was created and is run by University of South Carolina Professor, Dr. Antonio “Tony” Rafael de la Cova. The two images used by Professor Lopez are birth and death certificates available online only on Dr. de la Cova’s site. Lopez concedes taking the images, but denies any misconduct. A very interesting dialogue on plagiarism, defamation, and what constitutes a “public record” can be found here:  Dr. de la Cova vs Professor Lopez