Woman Who Married Cuban Spy Suing JPMorgan For $57M For Hiding Country’s Cash 3

HECTOR GABINO/AP Ana Margarita Martinez won a $7.1 million judgment against the Cuban government for 'emotional distress' in 2001, after she found out her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, wasn't the man she thought he was.

HECTOR GABINO/AP
Ana Margarita Martinez won a $7.1 million judgment against the Cuban government for ’emotional distress’ in 2001, after she found out her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, wasn’t the man she thought he was.

By Dareh Gregorian, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

A Miami woman who was married to a Cuban double agent wants JPMorgan Chase to pay through the nose for allegedly hiding Cuban cash.

Ana Margarita Martinez won a $7.1 million judgment against the Cuban government for “emotional distress” in 2001, after she found out her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, wasn’t the man she thought he was.

She’d met Roque in 1992, after the former Cuban Air Force major made headlines for allegedly braving shark infested waters to swim to Gitmo seeking political asylum in the U.S.

They dated for three years before getting hitched.

Unbeknownst to Martinez, Roque was an FBI snitch – and an undercover Cuban agent who’d been sent to gather intel on the Cuban exile community in Miami. She found out both after he snuck out of their home one night in 1996, and then appeared on CNN in Cuba a few days later crowing about his accomplishments.

Adding insult to injury, when asked what he missed about Miami, he said just one thing: “My Jeep.”

Martinez, who’d been born in Cuba, said she’d been completely duped. “She believed that Roque shared her anti-communist ideals,” court papers say.

A federal judge in Florida found Cuba liable for Roque’s actions, saying he was “especially offended that Cuba – a country that disregards human rights – has callously trampled the rights of one of our own citizens on our own soil in furtherance of a vile criminal conspiracy.”

Feature continues here: JPMorgan Hides Cuban Assets

JOSE GOITIA/CP Roque was an FBI snitch – and an undercover Cuban agent who'd been sent to gather intel on the Cuban exile community in Miami.

JOSE GOITIA/CP
Juan Pablo Roque was an FBI snitch – and an undercover Cuban agent who’d been sent to gather intelligence on the Cuban exile community in Miami.

 

Hijacked Cuban Planes Still Caught in Limbo 2

FILE - In this Tuesday Nov. 12, 2002 file photo, old single engine airplane are seen at a Cuban airport in Los Palacios, near Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Cuban pilot Nemencio Carlos Alonso Guerra stole a small plane, similar to these shown, and flew to Florida with seven relatives. At face value, they are three old planes not worth much more their parts and scrap metal. Stolen from the Cuban government during a six-month period ending in April 2003 - two by hijackers, one by its pilot - all three landed at Key West International Airport, a 116-mile flight from struggling Havana to the gleaming shores of the U.S. (AP Photo/Jose Goitia, File)

FILE – In this Tuesday Nov. 12, 2002 file photo, old single engine airplane are seen at a Cuban airport in Los Palacios, near Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Cuban pilot Nemencio Carlos Alonso Guerra stole a small plane, similar to these shown, and flew to Florida with seven relatives. At face value, they are three old planes not worth much more their parts and scrap metal. Stolen from the Cuban government during a six-month period ending in April 2003 – two by hijackers, one by its pilot – all three landed at Key West International Airport, a 116-mile flight from struggling Havana to the gleaming shores of the U.S. (AP Photo/Jose Goitia, File)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Christine Armario  (AP) KEY WEST, Fla. — At face value, they are three old planes not worth much more than their parts and scrap metal. Stolen from the Cuban government during a six-month period ending in April 2003 — two by hijackers, one by its pilot — all three landed at Key West International Airport, a 116-mile flight from struggling Havana to the gleaming shores of the U.S.

Fidel Castro repeatedly demanded the planes be returned. Instead, they were seized by U.S. courts to satisfy part of a $27 million judgment won by a Cuban-American woman who had unwittingly married a Cuban spy in Miami.

The story of what happened to the planes in the ensuing years reads like another chapter in the history of stymied, contentious U.S.-Cuba relations, with the new owners unable to get the planes anywhere.

The first of the three planes to land in Key West was a yellow, Soviet-built crop-duster that pilot Nemencio Carlos Alonso Guerra used to fly seven passengers, many of them relatives, to the U.S. in November 2002.

Cuba wanted the biplane back, but a Florida judge agreed with Ana Margarita Martinez that it should be seized and sold to partially pay the judgment she was awarded under an anti-terrorism law. In 1996, her husband, Juan Pablo Roque, had fled back to Cuba after infiltrating the Miami-based anti-Castro group Brothers to the Rescue. The next day, Cuban fighter jets shot down two of the group’s Cessnas over international waters, killing four pilots.

The aging Antonov AN-2 Colt was auctioned at the Key West airport in 2003 and Martinez placed the highest bid, $7,000.

“We had a victory — we got to keep this property of the Cuban government,” Martinez said after the auction.

She hoped to sell it for a profit later but instead gave it to Cuban-American artist Xavier Cortada, who painted half of it with a colorful mural as part of an exhibit commemorating Cuba’s independence.

After the exhibit, Cortada eventually donated the plane to Florida International University, which planned to display it but couldn’t find a building to house it. Today, it deteriorates under tarps on a far corner of FIU’s campus.

Article continues here:  Hijacked Cuban planes still caught in limbo

My Life is a Lifetime Movie with Ana Margarita Martinez Reply

by Reg Seeton, Deadbolt.com

Ana Margarita Martinez learns that her husband was really a Cuban spy in My Life is a Lifetime Movie.

My Life is a Lifetime Movie makes its series debut this week with the real life story of Ana Margarita Martinez who discovered that her husband was a spy for the Cuban government.

With a fresh and irreverent documentary style tone, My Life is a Lifetime Movie combines cinematic recreations and first person interviews with women in peril who recount their jaw-dropping experiences that are so astonishing and so unbelievable, it’s hard to believe they’re true. But the stories are all too real and vivid for those who lived them.

One amazing story on My Life is a Lifetime Movie is that of Ana Margarita Martinez, a twice divorced mother who thought she found her prince charming but turned out to be a Cuban spy. That’s right, a spy! When Ana Margarita met Cuban defector Juan Pablo at her local church back in the early ’90s, he was the perfect man in every way. The two quickly married and things seemed too good to be true until his frequent disappearances and trips away from home raised suspicion. When a plane rescuing Cuban refugees was shot down near Miami, Ana came to the stark realization that her storybook wedding may have been to a dark prince with even darker secrets. “I’ve always said that my life is a soap opera,” Ana Margarita told The Deadbolt ahead of the Lifetime premiere on Wednesday, “so this is very appropriate.” What happened to Ana Margarita, however, is a painful story of secrets, betrayal, denial, and a long road to recovery after being duped by someone who was supposed to be her partner for life.

My Life is a Lifetime Movie debuts Wednesday, October 17 at 10/9c on Lifetime.

In 1996, Ana’s life changed forever. One night her husband was there when they went to bed, the next minute he was gone. “I don’t remember the moment precisely,” Ana continued, “because it was a process when it first happened. He disappeared, telling me that he was going on a business trip for the weekend and that he’d be back on Sunday. He disappeared on Friday morning, 3 a.m. in the morning, and he was scheduled to return on Sunday.”

Although we all encounter the unexpected in life, Ana Margarita could never have prepared for what was about to come next. Working for Brothers to the Rescue, a Cuban-American activist organization that helped rescue refugees lost at sea, Juan Pablo had taken off for Cuba. The following day, two planes from the organization were shot down by the Cuban government, four pilots were killed, and Juan Pablo was allegedly in custody. Or was he? As the real life drama played out, it was all a ruse. Juan Pablo was a spy.

“A lot was going on all at once,” said Ana Margarita about the chaos following her husband’s disappearing act, “and he was nowhere to be found. The rumors began on Monday morning. The press showed up at my house, the FBI showed up at my house, and then I saw him [on television] disembarking a plane in Havana. That’s how I found out he was in Havana.”

So, how did Ana feel at that unbelievably shocking moment? “I saw him in that moment and I was in denial,” Ana added. “I felt that my husband had been forced to return to Cuba. He could not have gone under his own free will. He was a defector. It took therapy to come to the realization that I had been duped and accept the fact that he was actually a Cuban spy, that he was a mole in the United States and had been called back.”

After having her marriage to the spy annulled in civil court, Ana Margarita won two judgments against the Cuban government for their role in the fraud. Despite the victory, however, the debt remains unpaid to this day. Sixteen years later, ahead of My Life is a Lifetime Movie, Ana Margarita is now able to talk about her ordeal with reflective clarity. Although she’s moved on with her life and is now a stronger, much wiser woman, the wounds of betrayal still run deep.

“It’s tough to accept that someone that you spent four years of your life with, who was your partner, your best friend, and you trusted with your life and the life of your children, had a whole different life you weren’t aware of. That’s difficult to fathom. How could he have kept this deep, dark secret from me? I think the hardest thing, the most painful thing, is the sense of betrayal.”

For more on the real story of Ana Margarita Martinez, visit her official website. My Life is a Lifetime Movie premieres Wednesday, October 17 at 10pm ET on Lifetime.

New Series Will Feature Cuban Spy’s Ex-Wife Reply

MIAMI STORY TO PREMIERE ON LIFETIME TELEVISION SERIES

The story of Ana Margarita Martinez will be told mini-documentary style on the new series.

(Miami, FL – October 2012) – The story of Ana Margarita Martinez, a Miami woman who was married to Cuban spy Juan Pablo Roque, was chosen to launch a new series on the new Lifetime series “My Life is a Lifetime Movie”. The series will feature her story on its first episode Wednesday, October 17th at 10:00 p.m. The “My Husband was a Cuban Spy” segment will run that evening from 10:30 to 11:00 p.m. EST.

Ana Margarita Martinez was a divorced mother of two when she met Juan Pablo Roque at her church in Coral Gables. After a three-year relationship, they married and she finally had her white picket fence. Roque – a hero in the community until then because of his dramatic “defection” from Cuba (later learned to have been staged), was a model husband who also won her young children’s hearts.

On February 23, 1996, he left for an alleged business trip and turned up in Cuba just two days after Cuban MiG’s shot down two U.S. civilian planes killing four volunteer pilots and co-pilots in a Brothers to the Rescue search and rescue mission – an organization to which her then husband, a former Cuban MiG, had been a member. Juan Pablo Roque’s marriage to her had been part of his cover – and a sham, making Ana Margarita and her children a part of the Machiavelic espionage plan. Ana Margarita watched in horror as her husband reappeared on the CNN News disembarking a Cubana de Aviación airplane in Havana after the shoot-down. It was soon discovered that he was a spy for the Cuban government, as well as a paid informant for the FBI.

Three years after Roque returned to Cuba, Ana Margarita – who had by then annulled her marriage to the Cuban spy in a civil court of law – won two judgments against the Cuban government for their role in the fraud. The debt is still unpaid. In her personal battle against the Cuban government, Ana Margarita has seized three Cuban airplanes that have arrived at U.S. territory as partial payment to her judgment. Her story has circulated the globe.

In February of 2010, lawyers for Ana Margarita filed motions to garnish eight charter companies that do business with the Cuban government in order to collect the legal debt ordered by a circuit court judge. Those ongoing proceedings thrust her into the news again. The Obama Administration intervened in this judicial process, representing the interests of the Cuban government against Martinez, a U.S.-born citizen. The administration’s actions, totally dismissing the 2001 existing judgment against the terrorist state, not only justify the spy’s activity, sexual battery and torture, but also show a dangerous precedent to the U.S. blocking court orders against terrorist states, which is to serve as a deterrent.

The Lifetime Television series has a mini-documentary style format and is told in the voice of the protagonist.

A viewing party for “My Husband was a Cuban Spy” will be held at Wednesday, October 17th at 8:30 p.m. at Miss Yip Chinese Bistro located at 900 Biscayne Boulevard in Miami.

For more information, call Elaine de Valle at (786) 853-8724 or visit www.anamargaritamartinez.com.

Cuban Spy Not a Mad Dog Reply

Marion Pruett and I   sat at a small table, facing each other. He was on Death Row for the 1981 killing of a convenience store clerk in Arkansas. Later he told police:  I pulled in and was going to get gas and I   seen that there was a girl working there by herself and I said well hell, I   think I’ll just rob her and kill her so that’s what I done. I asked if he’d   kill again. I remember him saying something like this:  Put it this way. If there were a gun on the   table and you pissed me off, I’d blow your head off. No wonder his nickname was “Mad Dog.” I interviewed Pruett for The Coloradoan in Fort Collins, Colo. Authorities accused him of killing at least four other people, including his wife.  I asked about his childhood. He told me he fell off the back steps of his house when he was a boy. A Coke bottle he was holding broke and a shard of glass took out an eye. His life evidently went downhill from there. Pruett blamed his troubles on drugs. He wanted me to believe there was some good inside him somewhere. I wondered what his family thought. Don’t talk to my father, he warned. But I couldn’t do the story without talking to his family and relatives of people he killed. I wanted the full story, not just his side of it. I got his father on the phone. He told me his son was a rotten human being. Some 15 years later, on April 12, 1999, the state of Arkansas killed Mad Dog with a lethal injection. I wasn’t sorry about that. He was scum, a selfish, simple-minded cold-blooded bastard who killed people to support a drug habit. And the world is better off without him.

 

Other stories I’ve done over the years have been less serious, like the one about the boa constrictor that popped out of a woman’s toilet while she was on the seat. Other stories are more complicated, and they’re not all black and white, at least not to me. Take the case of Juan Pablo Roque, the former spy. He killed no one. At least he didn’t pull the trigger.

Story continues here:  http://alongthemalecon.blogspot.com/2012/10/cuban-spy-not-mad-dog.html

In Harshest Betrayal, Cuban Spy Deceived Wife 1

By Tracey Eaton, Florida Center for Investigative Reporting

Juan Pablo Roque kissed his wife goodbye at 3 a.m., saying he was leaving to help a friend haul his boat to the Florida Keys. Instead, he slipped back to Cuba, and the next time his wife saw him he was on CNN, denouncing the United States.

Ana Margarita Martinez said she couldn’t believe the man she had met in church in 1992 was actually a spy. She believes Roque should be prosecuted for his role in the 1996 shoot-down that killed four people off the coast of Cuba. “I think he should definitely pay a price for what he did, especially since there were four innocent people who died,” said Martinez, a public relations consultant in Miami.

Roque had infiltrated Brothers to the Rescue, an exile organization that sent planes into the Florida Straits looking for Cuban rafters. Cuban MiGs shot down two of the group’s planes on Feb. 24, 1996. “If he wasn’t directly involved, I’m sure that he had knowledge it was going to happen and that alone makes him guilty,” Martinez said. In 1999, a federal indictment charged Roque with failing to register as a foreign agent and conspiring to defraud the United States.

The ex-spy, now in Havana, denies blame in the shoot-down. Asked if he had anything to say to his ex-wife, Roque said he listened to Martinez’s radio and TV appearances in Miami after the story broke in 1996. But he said he soon stopped paying attention because he heard “many things that were grossly altered and false.” “The only thing I would tell her is that she was born in Cuba and should remember she is Cuban,” he said. “That’s all I would say.”

Martinez shot back:  “Indeed I was born in Cuba, but I am a free Cuban-American whose heart is with the Cuban people, the courageous opposition leaders and dissidents who risk their lives daily for the sake of freedom, not with the criminal regime that has enslaved them, impoverished them and created an apartheid. “I am on the side of freedom and justice, and strongly opposed to a group of thugs who have destroyed a once very prosperous island, reducing it to a Third-World prison country where its people, out of desperation, escape risking their lives in dangerous shark-infested waters.”

Martinez had her marriage to Roque annulled on Oct. 15, 1996. “I was suffering for nearly 15 years — panic attacks, flashbacks, chronic anxiety, chronic depression, chronic fatigue syndrome. It was horrible. My life was a nightmare for 15 years in a large part due to Juan Pablo and his actions.”

Martinez has exacted a measure of revenge. She sued the Cuban government and a Florida judge awarded her $27 million in 2001. So far, she has collected some $230,000, most of which went for legal and other expenses. But she says it’s not about the money. “In the end, it’s really about seeking justice,” she said. “It’s not right that they get away with this and they don’t pay a price. I mean, if I go 90 miles per hour on the turnpike and I hit somebody and kill them, I can’t bring that life back, but I’m going to have to pay a price. “I lost my home and I lost my car because I lost my head. I was insane, suffering from all the classic symptoms of traumatic stress disorder. I lost a lot of material things and I lost a lot of things that you can’t replace. Is money going to bring back 15 years of my life that were hellish? No, it is not. But maybe it will make the next 15 years a little easier for my children.”

Martinez said her relationship with Roque began in 1992 and lasted four years. “When we met, my children were 7 and 8 years of age,” she said. “He won them over quickly and they soon saw him as a dad. When he left, they were 11 and 12. That is one of the saddest parts of this story — he broke my children’s hearts in pieces, too. It was very traumatic for all of us, not just to be betrayed to that level, but to be involved in an international incident including espionage and murder.”

Martinez said she believes Roque fooled so many people because he was “programmed” to deceive. She is not sympathetic to him now as he lives out his forced retirement in Cuba.

“I think Juan Pablo honestly thought in his heart that he was going to go back and be somebody. But you know the revolution eats its own children. “He thought he was going to be different from the rest. He is nobody in Cuba. Nobody even knows who he is anymore. He doesn’t have a job. They don’t give him work. Of course he’s not happy. Would you be happy if you tasted freedom and then you’re back in an island prison? He’s one miserable man.”