How CIA Agents in Cuba Turned Out to be Castro’s Intelligence Officers 1

Cuba's Ministry of the Interior -- home to its security and intelligence services

Cuba’s Ministry of the Interior, which oversees its security and intelligence services

By Sputnik News

Cuban pediatrician Eduardo Sagaro was recruited into the CIA in the late 1970s to conduct surveillance on Havana’s domestic and foreign operations. Unbeknownst to the agency, Sagara was one of a number of Cubans working as a double agent, feeding information from Washington to intelligence agencies in Havana.

Radio Sputnik’s Loud & Clear spoke with Sagaro about his experience, as he gives insight into US plans to dismantle the Cuban revolution.

A second-generation doctor, Sagaro graduated from the University of Havana in 1968, and has been practicing medicine for nearly 50 years. He said that the CIA was interested in him because he received his primary education in American schools, was able to speak English, and that his father was a Cuban government functionary in the National Health System and the Academy of Sciences. Sagaro said, “I was contacted by [Cuban] intelligence forces, they asked if I would agree to work as an agent, and I told them I had no reason to say no. They prepared me and sent me as bait abroad. And the CIA took interest in me, and after a long period of time, about a year, they decided to recruit me.”

Sagaro explained that the CIA was mainly interested in health issues in Cuba and Cuba’s involvement in the Angola war for independence against Portugal. Trained by engineers sent from the US, the double-agent communicated with agency headquarters in Langley, Virginia, by encoded radio transmissions, smuggling in codes in secret compartments in his shoes and wallet.

He said that the agency inquired about the National Health System’s response to diseases that were at the time becoming issues in Cuba including Hepatitis B and conjunctivitis.

Loud & Clear host Brian Becker asked, “Were they carrying out biological weapons systems against the Cuban revolution?” Sagaro said, “I think that they were,” and added, “they were also interested on the impact of those epidemics. How were the emergency department and the hospitals? Were the medicines available? Where was the Cuban government bringing chemicals against mosquitos? And why did they want to know?” When asked if he thought that the CIA was actually interested in curing disease in Cuba, Sagaro laughingly replied, “Not probably.”

Listen to the interview here:  Cuban Double Agent Operations

New JFK Assassination Theory: Cuban Double Agent Led Plot 7

Rene Dussaq

                     Rene Dussaq

By Joshua Rhett Miller, New York Post

More than 50 years after President John F. Kennedy was gunned down in Dallas, new evidence uncovered in the secret diaries of a Cold War spy and assassin implicates another clandestine figure believed to be working as a double agent for Cuba, an explosive new book claims.

The never-before-revealed diaries of Douglas DeWitt Bazata, a decorated officer for the United States Office of Strategic Services — the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency — claim that his longtime close friend and fellow spy, René Alexander Dussaq, was a “primary organizer and plotter” of Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963.

The diaries reveal that Dussaq might even have fired the fatal “shot or shots” that killed the 35th president of the United States, according to author Robert K. Wilcox’s latest book, “Target: JFK, The Spy Who Killed Kennedy?,” which goes on sale Nov. 14.

“Douglas Bazata was deeply embedded in the world of secrets, especially those surrounding JFK’s death,” Wilcox writes. “He was there at the birth of the CIA as an early and major player in that murkiest of worlds … He was an insider.”

In his diaries, Bazata wrote that the two men first met in Havana, Cuba, during the early 1930s, when Bazata, a US Marine, was given his first mission as a hitman: to assassinate a Cuban revolutionary. The mission failed, but the pair’s bond was sealed forever after Dussaq saved Bazata’s life.

The bond deepened in 1944, when both men were part of WWII’s Operation Jedburgh, in which more than 250 American and Allied paratroopers jumped behind enemy lines across France, the Netherlands and Belgium to fight against German occupation. Dussaq’s larger-than-life legend began here: He was nicknamed “Captain Bazooka” for demonstrating the Army’s new anti-tank rocket launchers to the Maquis, French resistance guerrillas. He’s also credited with bluffing a German general into believing he was surrounded by American troops, leading to the capture of up to 500 Nazis.

Dussaq — who was born in Buenos Aires and educated in Geneva and Cuba — became a naturalized US citizen in 1942. The son of a Cuban diplomat, he had tried to enlist after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor but was deemed a potential security risk. However, the US Army was desperate for infantrymen at the time and ultimately accepted him. Dussaq quickly rose through the ranks, becoming a lieutenant instructor for the elite 101st Airborne Division, the “Screaming Eagles.”

One top-ranked OSS official told his counterparts in London that Dussaq, who spoke six languages, was an exceptional athlete and a master of “unusual and hazardous work of a physical nature,” references to earlier work as a deep-sea diver, treasure hunter and Hollywood movie stuntman.

Article continues here:  Cuban Double Agent Led JFK Plot

 

[Alleged] Cuban Double Agent Reveals CIA Machinations in Cuba 5

Enemigo by Raúl Capote, Editorial Jose Marti.

Enemigo by Raúl Capote, Editorial Jose Marti.

Review by Raidel López

In Enemigo (enemy), Cuban writer and university professor of history, Raúl Capote, reveals his life as a double agent; agent Pablo for the CIA, and agent Daniel for Cuban intelligence. This is not a work of fiction or a classic spy novel. It is the real experience narrated by the protagonist about plans by the CIA and its allies to destroy the Cuban Revolution. His story reveals one of the many facets of the US war against Cuba. For over half a century plans of espionage, sabotage, terrorist attacks, assassination, subversion, military, economic and political aggression, have been made and executed from the US. Most of these plans have failed, thanks to the work and sacrifice of men like Capote.

Capote does not consider himself to be anything but an ordinary Cuban. In the 1980s Capote was vice-director of the cultural association Hermanos Saiz, in Cienfuegos province. This organisation brings together artists, musicians, writers and others in the cultural field. Capote had published literature, which was known outside Cuba and was considered to be critical of Cuban society, even though it had been published by Cuban state publishers. This had caught the attention of the US Interests Section (USIS), a substitute for an embassy, in Havana. By the late 1980s, US officials had approached Capote offering him the chance to earn a lot of money by publishing ‘critical’ literature. Capote began working at the University Enrique José Barona in Havana as a history professor. CIA officials were interested in this work which allowed Capote to influence students. In the 1990s, USIS officials visited Capote with increasing frequency.

In May 2004, Capote was invited to dine at the home of Francisco Saen, a USIS official. The dinner was attended by diplomats and functionaries from several countries. There Capote met USIS officials Louis John Nigro Jr, Deputy Chief between June 2001 and June 2004, and Kelly Ann Keiderling, First Secretary of Press and Culture between July 2003 and June 2005. Keiderling befriended Capote and attempted to influence him and his family, inviting them to private dinners, giving them presents, promising them a prosperous future in the US, inculcating them with US ‘values’ and generally trying to influence their thinking. Keiderling was trying to recruit Capote to the CIA as part of a comprehensive plan to convert young Cuban intellectuals into enemies of the Revolution.

In 2005, the CIA concluded its studies and tests of Capote and he was officially recruited by Rene Greenwald, who used the pseudo name ‘El Gran Amigo’ (the great friend). Greenwald is a CIA veteran who participated in undercover actions against Cuba in the 1960s and worked in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru, in dirty war operations to assist military dictatorships allied to the US government (p75). Meanwhile, Capote had signed up to work for Cuban intelligence, reflecting where his real loyalties lay. Capote recalls that the CIA tests never stopped, including putting him in threatening situations to see whether he would break. He never did.

Feature continues here:  Double Agent

 

 

JFK assassination: What Did Castro Know? 3

By Brian Latell, CTP.ICCAS@Miami.edu

Fidel Castro knew that the CIA was trying to kill him. There was no doubt; his sources were reliable. “For three years,” he told congressional investigators in 1978, “we had known there were plots against us.”

The most promising of them ripened in a Paris safe house 50 years ago. Rolando Cubela, known in CIA by the cryptonym AMLASH, had the starring role. A veteran of the Castro brothers’ guerrilla war, he was already an accomplished assassin. He held high military rank, knew the Castros, and frequented a beach house next to one that Fidel used. Cubela was recruited by the CIA, trained in secret communications and demolitions techniques. He insisted he wanted to kill Fidel. That was music to the ears of top CIA officials.

On Oct. 5, 1963 he met with his agency handler in a CIA safe house in a Paris suburb near Versailles. Nestor Sanchez had a stellar career in covert operations, spoke fluent Spanish, and had taken over the AMLASH case a month earlier. The Cuban told Sanchez he was not interested in “unimportant tasks;” he wanted “to undertake the big job.”

But first he needed assurances. He demanded a meeting with a senior Kennedy administration official — but not just anyone. He wanted face time with the president’s brother, attorney general Robert Kennedy. Sanchez cabled CIA headquarters that Cubela wanted to be sure of American support “for any activity he undertakes” against Castro.

“We must be prepared to face the request,” he wrote. He knew he was urging something extremely dangerous. Cubela was proposing to entangle both Kennedy brothers in a murder conspiracy targeting Castro. If the demand were rejected, Sanchez warned, Cubela might bolt.

Caution should have overwhelmed at that juncture. There were already many reasons to doubt Cubela’s bona fides. Nevertheless, it was decided at CIA headquarters, probably in consultation with Robert Kennedy, that a senior agency official would meet Cubela as the attorney general’s representative.

Desmond FitzGerald delighted in the task. A CIA nobleman, East Coast socialite, and friend of the attorney general, he would go to Paris and provide the needed assurances. He intended to impress the Cuban, cabling Paris that the rendezvous should be staged as impressively “as possible.”

Sanchez reported back to FitzGerald that the meeting with Cubela was scheduled for Oct. 29. This unlikely pair — the moody Cuban spy and the elegant FitzGerald, Bobby Kennedy’s understudy — sat side by side and talked in the safe house. Sanchez translated.

Cubela was satisfied that the man who called himself James Clark was indeed a top American official close to Robert Kennedy. Almost no record of their meeting has survived, but it is known that Cubela spoke repeatedly of his need for an assassination weapon.

CIA made good on its commitment. Sanchez returned to Paris, and on November 22, 1963 met again secretly with Cubela. He brought with him a preposterous murder weapon: a pen fitted within a syringe that could be filled with poison and used to inoculate Castro.

In one of the strangest twists of modern history, Sanchez was explaining the device as the sun was setting in Paris. He took a call from FitzGerald in Washington: President Kennedy had just been shot in Dallas.

Read more here: JFK assassination: What did Castro know?